Tag: Wind

Manitoba

Powerful Supercells for SE Saskatchewan Bring Tornado Risk and…


An associated warm front will set the stage for parameters conducive for strong Tornadoes today for isolated regions in SE Saskatchewan.

Residents in Southeastern Saskatchewan should be extra vigilant to the sky as the current risk leads to a threat for 1 or 2 strong Tornadoes (EF2+), large hail (nickel to ‘ping-pong’ size) and damaging winds (100-120km+).

As the cells form mainly just west of Weyburn, quick evolution and a track E to ENE as LP (low precipitative) supercells will be prevalent. These cells are representative of large hail (in this case, ‘ping-pong size), and a risk for a Tornado a little after their original formation as shear levels drop a slightly.

As the cells continue to track into Manitoba, the cells will become more of a ‘line’ just across the border into Virden, Melita and Brandon – winds up to 120km/h+ are the main threat and the Tornado threat will diminish rapidly.

Elsewhere, isolated severe cells over a large swath of Saskatchewan and Manitoba are possible.

Amongst the most interesting parameter (one among many) is the LCL (lifted condensation level: represents the lowest level in which condensation can occur). Generally, the strongest Tornadoes in history are between 300-600m. LCL levels, in this case, are somewhat conducive to Tornadoes of EF2 or stronger nature.

Remember, summer thunderstorm forecasts  – severe and/or non-severe – represent a plausible scenario based on extensive weather calculations, parameters and up-to-date atmospheric data. Nothing is for certain, but outlines a possible or likely scenario based on the aforementioned points.

Please stay tuned, as we at TCW are monitoring this situation attentively.

Drive safe and always be alert during hazardous conditions.

For hourly and live storm updates around the clock, follow us on Twitter.
https://twitter.com/TransCANWeather

Newfoundland and Labrador

Snowy and Blizzard Conditions for Parts of Newfoundland


On Monday PM into early Wednesday, a low pressure system will sweep across the Maritimes, strengthen, and target mainly Southern and Central Newfoundland with wind and heavy snow.

As the day progresses on Monday, a strengthening low will provide ample moisture for especially Southern portions of Newfoundland with upwards of 30cm as a possibility.

The heaviest snowfall will occur mostly through the night on Monday, lingering into Tuesday, with slight residual amounts into early Wednesday.

Snow-days for regions such as Burgeo and St. Alban’s are probable on Tuesday and/or Wednesday.

Reduced visibility, alongside rapidly accumulating snowfall will be possible for Southern and Central portions of Newfoundland.

Winds up to 65-75km/h will indeed and further cause travel headaches.

At TransCanada Weather we urge you to monitor the weather closely and be prepared for longer commute times and/or travel delays.

For hourly and live storm updates around the clock, follow us on Twitter.
https://twitter.com/TransCANWeather