Tag: snow

Manitoba

Winter Storm to Bring Blizzard Conditions Throughout Thanksgiving Weekend…

A strengthening Colorado Low will bring a long-duration, widespread winter storm to portions of the Upper Midwest in the United States before moving into Manitoba and Northwestern Ontario with blizzard and ice storm conditions.

A band of light to moderate snow will cross Southern and Central Manitoba along a cold front throughout the early morning on Thursday bringing a widespread 2-5cm, locally 10cm of snow. Into the late morning and early afternoon, conditions will begin to deteriorate as a Colorado Low begins to push north towards the region.

Widespread snow is expected across Southern and Central Manitoba extending from the Saskatchewan border into Far Northwestern Ontario. Across the Southeastern Manitoba into Northwestern Ontario, heavy rain will begin to soak the already saturated ground. This will also begin the long-duration ice event which is expected along the Ontario-Manitoba border, east of Winnipeg, extending northeast towards Red Lake and Weagamow Lake in Northwestern Ontario.

The exact location of the system is yet to be determined. Most global forecast models are consistent with the system moving over the Lake of the Woods area, although, a slight shift in the track will make a major change in the forecast in terms of snowfall/rainfall locations, more significantly, the location of the significant ice.

SNOWFALL & BLIZZARD CONDITIONS – SOUTHERN REGIONS

Accumulations from the winter storm will vary greatly throughout Southern Manitoba with the heaviest accumulations throughout the higher terrain. Current guidance suggests snowfall totals will be highest between 30 and 50cm, locally higher towards 65cm+, in the extreme southern portion of Manitoba throughout the Red River Valley into the Darlingford Moraine region. This area has been highlighted with the extent of dark pink in the forecast map. Isolated totals near 70cm may be possible. Snowfall warnings are in effect for portions of this region.

Throughout this region, widespread winds between 60-80km/h are likely to cause significant blowing snow and possibly blizzard conditions. Whether blizzard warnings are issued or not, significant impacts on travel are likely across much of the major highways in the southern portion of the province. Highways such as 1 (Trans Canada Hwy.), 2, 3, 5, 23 and 75 should be avoided throughout the weekend.

The criteria for a blizzard classification and blizzard warning in Canada follow the 4-4-4 rule: 40km/h winds or greater causing widespread reductions in the visibility to 400 meters or less for at least 4 hours. A full list of alert criteria can be found here.

Extending inland towards Lake Manitoba, including Portage la Prairie, snowfall totals will be less in the 20-40cm range although local totals between 40-60cm are possible. The extent of this region can be seen in pink. This region also includes Boissevain to the west and Winkler/Altona to the east. This region continues in a swath between Lake Manitoba and Lake Winnipeg, extending just east of the lake as well, including Bloodvein. This region is less likely to see the locally higher totals. Snowfall ratios in this region will likely peak around 10:1 (10 inches of snow for 1 inch of water).

Extending out in all direction, snowfall totals are likely to decrease. This is seen in the dark blue shade on the map. Towards the west of Lake Manitoba, snowfall totals between 10-20cm are likely. There was some discussion within the team as to whether or not we should extend this region to the west of Northern Lake Winnipeg, although, we have went against this due to the expected location and size of the system. This remains a possible option, but, less likely at this time. Between Southern Lake Winnipegosis and Lake Winnipeg, 10-20cm of snow is also possible. Towards the east, including Winnipeg, as well as areas east of Lake Winnipeg to the Ontario border, snowfall totals between 10-20cm are likely throughout the weekend with local totals towards 30cm. Finally, areas northeast of Lake Winnipeg through the Poplar region towards the God’s Lake region will also see between 10-20cm of snow with an increased risk of 20-30cm.

Towards the west into Saskatchewan, a brief period of snow is likely to bring generally 5cm of snow to the region. Further into Manitoba, 5-10cm is expected from the ‘after side’ of this system. In Ontario and Southeastern Manitoba, 5-10cm is likely with most, if not all, the snow remaining melt-on-contact due to the expected heavy rainfall throughout the system. Towards Lake Superior, snowfall totals will be localized to 5cm with limited to no visible accumulations likely.


Projected snowfall totals between Thursday, October 10th to Sunday, October 13th

SNOWFALL & BLIZZARD CONDITIONS – NORTHERN REGIONS

Accumulations from the winter storm will be significant along the Manitoba/Ontario border. The heaviest accumulations will occur in the pink region. This region extends from between Poplar Park Reserve in Manitoba and Opasquia Park in Ontario along the border to Sturgeon Lake in Ontario. Snowfall totals between 25-45cm are likely with local amounts approaching or surpassing 50cm. Outside of this region, a widespread 10-20cm, locally 25cm is likely within the dark blue region. This extends from Lake Winnipeg through to Sandy Lake and Sachigo Lake in Ontario towards Hudson Bay. with the heaviest accumulations throughout the higher terrain. A winter storm warning is in effect for portions of this region.

In the light blue region, which extends from Hudson Bay through to Lake Winnipeg and Big Trout Lake, Ontario, snowfall totals between 5-10cm are possible. Local totals towards 15cm are possible into Manitoba, although, current guidance suggests this is unlikely.


Projected snowfall totals between Thursday, October 10th to Sunday, October 13th

ICE STORM

Across Southeastern Manitoba, southeast of Winnipeg, extending into Northwestern Ontario along the Manitoba/Ontario border, a long-duration ice storm is increasingly likely.

As temperatures near 0 C throughout the long-duration of the winter storm, freezing rain and ice pellets will be a large concern along the border of the provinces towards the south. With the system expected to track of Lake of the Woods, heavy rain is likely across portions of Southeastern Manitoba (Buffalo Point westward) and much of Northwestern Ontario. A thin band of moderate to heavy freezing rain is likely to remain stationary for multiple hours.

Extending from the Vita/Marchand area in Manitoba through the Ontario border into the Red Lake and MacDowell Lake areas, heavy freezing rain between 15-30mm of ice is possible. In a tight gradient outside of this region, the freezing rain totals will quickly drop off in a thin 5-15mm ice range followed by a large 2-5mm ice range. This larger area extends from Hudson Bay through Big Trout Lake into the Whiteshell Provincial Park area in Manitoba. The attached map highlights the possibly affected areas, but due to the tight gradient, we have not added totals onto the map.

Widespread wind gusts between 40-60km/h, locally higher towards Southern Manitoba will likely result in widespread power outages in the affected communities. Highways such as 1 /17 (Trans Canada Hwy.), 44, 105, 307, 596, 658 should be avoided throughout the weekend.


Projected freezing rain totals between Wednesday (pm), October 9th to Sunday, October 13th

RAINFALL

Across Northwestern Ontario and Southeastern Manitoba, heavy rain will bring a wide swath of 40-70mm to the region. Local totals between 70-90mm will be possible in the strongest bands in the system. Rainfall warnings have been issued for these regions as there are numerous communities already dealing with flooding throughout the area.

You can continue to monitor weather alerts issued by Environment Canada from their website: https://weather.gc.ca/warnings/index_e.html

Alberta

Long-Duration Snowstorm Brings Early Season Chill Across British Columbia…

A strengthening Colorado Low will bring a long-duration, widespread snowstorm to portions of British Columbia, Alberta, and Saskatchewan before lingering into Manitoba and Northern Ontario.

A weak low is expected to bring a snowstorm to the mountains of British Columbia and Alberta on Friday lasting through to Sunday. Strengthening into the weekend, on Saturday, a strong low is expected to form near the Wyoming/Colorado border before moving east towards Northwestern Ontario before phasing out and reorganizing into a low which will bring widespread rain to portions of Northeastern and Southern Ontario.

WESTERN PRAIRIES & SOUTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA SNOWFALL TOTALS

Accumulations from the snowstorm will vary greatly throughout Southern Alberta/Saskatchewan with the heaviest accumulations throughout the mountains. Current guidance suggests snowfall totals will be highest between 30 and 60cm, locally higher towards 70cm+, in the extreme southwestern portion of Alberta throughout Waterton Lakes National Park towards Pincher Creek, where the extent of red is shaded in the forecast map. Isolated totals near 100cm may be possible. Along the United States border extending into the mountains, highlighted in pink, snowfall totals between 15 and 30cm are likely with pockets of snow towards 40cm possible throughout the mountains. The highest snowfall totals are due to the position of the low creating an ‘up-sloping’ event where the snow is driven up and into the mountains and foothills allowing for significant accumulations. Snowfall ratios in this region will likely peak around 10:1 (10 inches of snow for 1 inch of water).

Down the mountains into the foothills and into the Central-Northern Rocky Mountains, Purcell Mountains, and Northern Selkirks Mountains, snowfall totals will be limited to 10-20cm with local totals towards 20-30cm. This includes Banff and Cranbrook, as well as, this region is highlighted in purple on the forecast map. In Extreme Southern Alberta, outside of the foothills will likely see between 10-20cm of snow. This includes the City of Lethbridge extending towards the southeast, also seen in purple on the forecast map. The snowfall totals may significantly drop off outside of the mountains and foothill regions as temperatures on Saturday through to Monday across the lower Prairie regions will be within 2 degrees of 0, meaning, snow may change over to rain at the lower elevations. This would significantly limit accumulations. The temperature change would be most prevalent in Extreme Southeastern Alberta into Southern Saskatchewan. Snowfall totals in this region are expected to be between 5-15cm are likely, which can be seen in purple on the forecast map, and circled. If temperatures trend cooler for this region, 10-20cm wouldn’t be out of the question for Southern Alberta and Southwestern Saskatchewan, extending as far in to include Shaunavon. Snowfall ratios will peak around the 3:1 and 5:1 range.

A general 5-15cm, locally up to 25cm, can be extended throughout the Rocky Mountains from the Lake Lousie region northwest into British Columbia extending towards Fort Nelson, as well as the Southern Selkirks Mountains and portions of the Monashees and Cascade Mountains. This would include Jasper and Grande Cache. This is highlighted in dark blue on the map. Across Southern Alberta and Southwestern Saskatchewan, a widespread 5-10cm, locally 15-20cm can be expected, also highlighted in dark blue. This includes Calgary, Medicine Hat, Swift Current, Rockglen, and Penticton. Elsewhere in light blue, flurries are likely. Snowfall totals around 5cm with local totals to 10-15cm are likely around Kelowna and Vernon. Snowfall totals will range under 5cm with local pockets sticking up to 10cm for portions of Saskatchewan and Central Alberta. Generally, the snow will melt-on-contact for a majority of the event for these highlighted regions, including Red Deer, Regina, and Saskatoon.

Environment Canada has issued widespread special weather statements across Southern, Western and Central Alberta, as well as, portions of British Columbia. Winter storm watches have been issued ahead of the snowstorm for Pincher Creek, Waterton Lakes National Park, Canmore, Okotoks, Cardston, and Fort Macleod regions.

Weather alerts can be monitored on Environment Canada’s website: https://weather.gc.ca/warnings/index_e.html

Projected snowfall totals between Friday, September 27th to Monday, September 30th

MANITOBA & ONTARIO SNOWFALL TOTALS

As the snowstorm producing low-pressure system crosses east, bringing the precipitation with it, light to moderate showers are likely across Southern Manitoba, and most of Northern Ontario. Alongside these showers, a band of flurries to light snow will cross portions of Central/Northern Manitoba into Far Northern Ontario. Snowfall totals less than or near 5cm are likely due to the snow mainly being melt-on-contact. A few pockets across Southwestern Manitoba and into Far Northern Ontario may see local totals towards 10cm. The highest confidence for locally higher totals is circled in red.

Projected snowfall totals between Monday, September 30th to Wednesday, October 2nd

BLOWING SNOW & STRONG WINDS

As the snow falls across the Southern Prairies, increasing wind speeds will bring the threat for hazardous traveling conditions in fast accumulating snow and falling snow. Current guidance suggests wind speeds will range from 30-50km/h across Southern Alberta and Southern Saskatchewan later in the day on Saturday extending through to Sunday morning. During the afternoon and evening on Sunday, winds will likely increase to 40-70km/h before 40-60km/h wind gusts settle in across Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and Ontario as the system weakens and phases out beginning mid-day Monday.

Blizzard conditions are possible.

Blowing snow and falling snow may make travel hazardous on Highway 1, 2, 3, and 4 across Southern Alberta and on Highway 1, 13, 18, 21, and 37 in Southern Saskatchewan.

Ontario

Colorado Low Threatens Snow, Heavy Rain & Strong Winds…

Don’t let the calendar fool you – a bitter sweet transition to spring is expected. The final two weeks of winter will feature drastic temperature swings and at least one notable storm system this weekend.

An area of low-pressure will form lee of the Rockies in Colorado Friday. Deepening as it tracks northeastwards through the United States towards the Great Lakes Region Saturday evening.

Key Details:
15-25mm of rain across deep Southwestern Ontario & North of Lake Erie. Rain combined with snow-melt may lead to localized flooding.
10-20cm of snow for Northern Ontario. Heaviest snow falling East of Lake Superior & across the Nickel Belt.
Strong to damaging wind gusts for Southwestern & Central Ontario.
A surge of warm air in Southern Ontario precedes wrap around strong winds & snow

*Click image to toggle zoom.

SNOW FOR NORTHERN ONTARIO

Like many of the storms this season, this system will feature appreciable snow across Northern Ontario. A large swath of 10-15cm is forecast for Wawa, Timmins and Sudbury areas. Local amounts may approach 20cm.

MESSY WINDSTORM FOR SOUTHERN ONTARIO

First and foremost, this is a messy system for Southern Ontario. Precipitation will move into Windsor in deep Southwestern Ontario around 6pm Saturday. Progressing Northeastwards across Southern Ontario during the evening and overnight. Main concern for along the Lake Erie shoreline will be heavy downpours combined with warmer temperatures, snow melt, and runoff. Minor flooding is possible; stretching into the GTA. Be sure to monitor any statements from your local conservation authority, as we progress through the weekend.

Strong to damaging easterly winds will develop ahead of the storm Saturday evening & overnight. The strongest wind gusts are expected East of Lake Huron. Including Goderich, where peak winds could exceed 100km/h late Saturday evening & overnight. The rest of Southern Ontario will have to contend with strong easterly winds gusting 60-90km/h through the overnight into Sunday morning. Once again, winds will strengthen out of the West Sunday, with the passage of a cold front. Frequent gusts between 50-70km/h is expected.

Considering temperatures will be teetering around the freezing mark, precipitation may begin as snow, freezing rain or ice pellets. Especially, South of Georgian Bay where elevation and heavy precipitation rates will aide in keeping temperatures below freezing for a longer duration. For Eastern Ontario, this system will bring more wet snow than rain. Refer to our forecast map for further details.

Alberta

[UPDATED] Prairies: Not Your Usual Clipper System This Weekend

Alberta Clippers are synonymous for bringing snowfall lee of the Canadian Rockies, during December and January. These typically moisture-starved systems are fast movers, ejecting quickly out of Alberta, through the Southern Prairies – towards the Great Lakes. Read more about Alberta Clippers here.

A clipper is expected to form in Northern Alberta Saturday evening. Normally, these systems are more of a nuisance, accompanied by low snowfall totals and quick forward motion. On the contrary, this weekends system will flourish. Thanks to clashing temperatures and abundant Pacific moisture.

SNOWFALL TOTALS

Accumulations will vary greatly throughout the Prairies, bearing in mind the heaviest snow will fall along a narrow swath. Current guidance suggests close to 15cm across the northern extent of the darker shaded region (in our forecast map). Including, Northern & Central Alberta. The heaviest snow (~20cm) will fall across Extreme Southwest Manitoba and Southeast Saskatchewan. *Model guidance has increased snowfall totals further into Southwestern Manitoba, where Environment Canada has issued snowfall warnings. Several warnings now stretch across parts of Prairies.

There will be another swath of snow tracking down the Rockies, bringing 10-20cm. It looks like Calgary will be limited to less than 5cm through Friday. By Saturday, a steep contrast in temperature envelopes the Prairies. Calgary will see a high of 9c and sunshine. Whereas, Eastern Saskatchewan will still be below freezing.

Projected snowfall totals through this weekend.

STRONG WINDS & BLOWING SNOW

Winds pickup between the Grande Prairie – Whitecourt corridor early Saturday evening. Winds sustained at or over 30km/h, gusting 60-80km/h. Gusty winds will overspread much of Alberta and Southern Saskatchewan overnight Saturday into Sunday morning. The strongest wind gusts aren’t expected to coincide with the heaviest swath of snow. Still, freshly fallen snowfall, which is dry and light – will combine with gusty winds. Bringing local blowing and drifting snow. Stay tuned to weather advisories, or statements pertaining to any potential road closures.

Ontario

A Wintery Mix Supersedes Extreme Cold Across the Great…

Winter returns to the Great Lakes, after an extended lull in activity and cold air between December and early January. Find out where, and, how bad the ‘next one’ will be.

KEY DETAILS

An area of low-pressure tracks through Illinois late this evening. Tracking through Michigan & Northeast Ontario by Wednesday afternoon & evening. Precipitation begins as snow across Central, Northeastern, and much of Southwestern Ontario Tuesday evening.

Freezing rain and ice pellets begin after 9pm across the Windsor – Sarnia corridor. Changing to rain, with little impact. Freezing rain spreads north of Lake Erie through the overnight. 3-6 hours of freezing rain is expected before changing over to rain. 

Snowfall continues across much of Central, Southwestern, and Eastern Ontario overnight into Wednesday morning. A lull in snow develops across the 400 corridor near 7am. Lowering snowfall totals across Southern Simcoe county; risk of freezing drizzle.

South of the 401/402 changes over to all rain during the early morning. Freezing rain continues along the escarpment (West of Lake Ontario). A changeover to rain continues North & East throughout the afternoon, proceeded by brief freezing rain.

Snow continues North of Lake Simcoe and North of Ottawa through the afternoon. A extended period (5-8 hours) of freezing rain develops Wednesday afternoon in Montreal, after a period of snow. Conditions will be hazardous in the City.

Projected precipitation totals across Southern Ontario Tuesday night through Wednesday.

TOTALS

A primarily snow event stretching from Bruce and Huron county’s through Georgian Bay. Also, putting parts of Eastern and Northeastern Ontario in a swath of 15-25cm. Little accumulation north of Lake Erie, but watch for icing with the potential of 5-8mm of accretion before the changeover to rain. 2-4cm of snow across the GTA, with brief freezing rain. A larger swath of 5-10cm of snow is expected across the light blue shaded area on our forecast map.

Ontario

Fall Windstorm Targets Great Lakes Tuesday

A classic fall windstorm will track through the Great Lakes Tuesday, bringing strong winds, snow, and rain across Ontario.

A compact area of low-pressure is forecast to deepen overnight Monday, as it tracks through Michigan. Bringing strong wind & rain across Southern Ontario. Concurrently, bringing snow to Northwestern Ontario.

SOUTHERN ONTARIO: STRONG WINDS & RAIN SHOWERS

By Tuesday morning, rain showers will become more numerous as a large area of precipitation moves north from the United States. 5-15mm of rainfall in the morning, preceded by sunny breaks across South Central & Southwestern Ontario by the early/mid afternoon. Temperatures will likely spike into the low teens by the afternoon.

Winds will become stronger throughout the late morning. Becoming the strongest through the afternoon and evening. Widespread wind gusts between 60-80km/h is expected through the afternoon/evening Tuesday. The strongest winds, potentially exceeding 90km/h, are possible in the Niagara Region, Prince Edward, Bruce & Grey Counties.

Projected wind gusts Tuesday 4pm EST. Wind speeds are in knots. 1 knot=1.85km/h.

The strong winds will likely strip many of the remaining leaves from trees. Remember to clean fallen leaves from storm drains.

NORTHWESTERN ONTARIO

While the South contends with wind & rain, Northwestern Ontario will see snowfall. The heaviest snowfall is expected across far-Northwestern Ontario. Another area of snowfall is expected northwest of Thunder Bay. General amounts between 5-10cms is expected Tuesday.

Much colder air with light-snow, is expected for Thunder Bay through Wednesday & Thursday.

Snowfall projections for Northwestern Ontario through Tuesday.

COLDEST AIR OF THE SEASON IS ON THE HORIZON

The warm up will be short-lived. The coldest air of the season, accompanied by lake effect snow arrives this weekend. Daily low temperatures will become consistently negative beyond Friday, November 9th across Southern Ontario. With daytime highs around the freezing mark for several days. Lake effect snow will really begin to ramp up beginning late week. 

Manitoba

Early Fall Snowfall Strikes Manitoba & Saskatchewan

Tricky driving associated with an early taste of winter across Southern Saskatchewan & Southern Manitoba.

Snow begins today in Saskatchewan and Southwestern Manitoba, persisting into Wednesday across Manitoba and Northwestern Ontario.

SYNOPSIS:

A boundary separating cold and warm air will descend Southwards across Southern Saskatchewan & Southern Manitoba through Tuesday allowing temperatures to dip near the freezing mark. A drop in temperatures near freezing or just below is expected along a narrow band of light-moderate snow developing across the Southern Prairies. Concurrently, an area of low pressure will strengthen through Wednesday, as it tracks out of Montana into the Dakotas. 

A narrow band of snowfall situated across Western Saskatchewan will increase in coverage and intensity throughout the evening, spreading across all of Southern Saskatchewan and Manitoba tonight. Continuing across a narrow corridor of Manitoba and Northwestern Ontario Wednesday.

This will be wet snow event for southwestern Manitoba (including Brandon). Light tree damage due to heavy-wet snow is possible Wednesday. 

EXPECTED ACCUMULATIONS:

5-15cm is expected across a narrow swath from Extreme Southern Saskatchewan through Southern Manitoba.

Winnipeg will see a cold rain, changing over to wet snow. Timing of the changeover to wet snow is leading to uncertainty, regarding accumulation.

Higher elevation in the Parklands Region, may see higher accumulations near, or exceeding 20cm. Including Riding Mountain National Park and the Dauphin area. 

Alberta

Canada Winter 2018-2019 Forecast: Frigid Prairies and Significant Lake-Effect…

Canada-Wide 2018-2019 Preliminary Forecast.
Finalized Outlook by Christmas!

Frigid Air and Heavy Squalls Loom

The winter across Canada for many this season is expected to be cold, particularly for Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, and Quebec.

Through careful analysis of meteorological data, we have compiled a preliminary forecast for the winter across Canada for this winter. We will issue an updated version, should the situation warrant, in December.

For many places, we expect an early start to winter. Some places in Manitoba have already received accumulating snow. For Southern Ontario, we expect accumulating snow perhaps as early as late October.

Key Highlights
– Frigid & Snowy Winter for Saskatchewan and Manitoba
– Cold & Stormy for Ontario and Quebec
– Potentially Historic Squalls for Great Lakes (NW and W Flow)
– Several Winter Storms for Maritimes and NL but Not All Snow

British Columbia
For this winter BC is expected to receive a relatively typical winter season. Normal precipitation amounts with normal temperatures will be present in the region. While a few colder outbreaks are certainly likely with some snow getting into the mainland, we expect nothing out of the ordinary.

Prairies
From Alberta to Saskatchewan to Manitoba, we expect a frigid winter overall. While Alberta is expected to receive moderating temperatures throughout the winter from Pacific air flows, Saskatchewan and Manitoba are expected to be exceptionally cold, and at times, record-breaking with several rounds of ‘deep-freezes’. Precipitation is expected to be slightly above normal for Alberta, and above normal for Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

Ontario & Quebec
Ontario is expected to be overall, cold this winter. Northwestern and Northern Ontario are expected to parallel the frigid air likewise to the Prairies. With the set-up of the storm track this winter, we expect more rounds of Colorado and Texas lows to infiltrate the Great Lakes and Southern Quebec for the first time in what has seemed to be a number of years.
The cold air from Manitoba and Saskatchewan will provide flourishing variables to allow a well-above and significantly active lake-effect season in an NW to W flow. Preliminary indications represent a repeat of December 2010 across the region.

Quebec is expected to receive above-normal snowfall this year as several storms track through the interior NE of the USA this year. Temperatures will become vastly more frigid through Northern regions of the province.


Maritimes and Newfoundland & Labrador
While the Maritimes and NL are expected to be active this year, it is expected at times, slightly milder air will target the regions, therefore, not all systems this year will be snow-makers. The regions will certainly be stormy this year, but several storms may end up more of a ‘wintry-mix’, rather than snowstorms. Temperatures will be slightly more moderated at times, although at times, cold bouts are certainly likely.

Territories
The Yukon is expected to receive slight benefits from Pacific air and a slight ridge at times over Western Canada/Western USA, providing relief at times relative to the typical winter in the region. Conversely, NWT and Nunavut are expected to receive normal precipitation


– TCW

Newfoundland and Labrador

Powerful Storm to Develop Across Newfoundland & Labrador Tuesday

A seasonably-deep low pressure system will develop rapidly Tuesday; impacting Newfoundland & Labrador.

The central pressure is forecast to deepen an incredible 22mb in 24 hours, almost reaching the criteria to be considered a “weatherbomb”.
#NLwx

Far, and largely unpopulated, Northeastern Labrador will see snow mix-in. Accumulating snow is possible in Greenland.

Expect pounding surf of 3-5m and beach erosion in Labrador. As well as, heavy rainfall and strong winds. Strongest winds to 90km/h will remain well off the coast.

Projected Wave Heights

NEWFOUNDLAND:

Western sections will see locally-heavy rainfall with this system. The biggest weather story is focused on a sudden change in weather pattern.

Warm & humid conditions dominating the Province will end, at least temporarily, with the passage of a cold front.

A cooler much-drier airmass will move across the province West to East throughout Tuesday.

 

Newfoundland and Labrador

Sorry Newfoundland – Some Regions to Receive Substantial Snow!


A strengthening low-pressure system will lead to a substantial – and unseemly – amounts of snow for parts of Newfoundland this week. Heavy snow, isolated freezing rain and heavy rain are probable.

Timing
Late Wednesday through Thursday.

Snow
The heaviest snow will reside around NE regions of Newfoundland where around, or slightly above 30cm, is possible. Undulating drier air and waves of moist air for N and NE regions of Newfoundland will allow for appreciable snowfall amounts, although somewhat localized on the upper-end of the aforementioned range due to the drier air. Elsewhere, 10-20cm is possible with slightly lesser amounts for Eastern regions of the province.

Freezing Rain
Localized freezing rain is possible south of Glovertown and SW of Eastport. Up to 7-8mm of accretion is not out-of-the-question, however, impact will be extremely localized; a mixed bag of precipitation – including rain showers – will melt much of the ice, nonetheless.

Rain
Heavy rain will inundate much of the Avalon Peninsula and the Southern Newfoundland shoreline and somewhat lesser, although still prevalent, near regions such as: Carbonear, Clarenville and Bonavista.

Wet snow for this entire region cannot be ruled out.

This is expected to be a reasonably significant system given the time of year – we know this it not the news Newfoundlanders want to hear!

Please adjust your driving habits accordingly.

Please stay tuned, as we at TCW are monitoring this situation attentively.

Drive safe and always be alert during hazardous conditions.

For hourly and live storm updates around the clock, follow us on Twitter.
https://twitter.com/TransCANWeather