Tag: Prairies

Alberta

Long-Duration Snowstorm Brings Early Season Chill Across British Columbia…

A strengthening Colorado Low will bring a long-duration, widespread snowstorm to portions of British Columbia, Alberta, and Saskatchewan before lingering into Manitoba and Northern Ontario.

A weak low is expected to bring a snowstorm to the mountains of British Columbia and Alberta on Friday lasting through to Sunday. Strengthening into the weekend, on Saturday, a strong low is expected to form near the Wyoming/Colorado border before moving east towards Northwestern Ontario before phasing out and reorganizing into a low which will bring widespread rain to portions of Northeastern and Southern Ontario.

WESTERN PRAIRIES & SOUTHERN BRITISH COLUMBIA SNOWFALL TOTALS

Accumulations from the snowstorm will vary greatly throughout Southern Alberta/Saskatchewan with the heaviest accumulations throughout the mountains. Current guidance suggests snowfall totals will be highest between 30 and 60cm, locally higher towards 70cm+, in the extreme southwestern portion of Alberta throughout Waterton Lakes National Park towards Pincher Creek, where the extent of red is shaded in the forecast map. Isolated totals near 100cm may be possible. Along the United States border extending into the mountains, highlighted in pink, snowfall totals between 15 and 30cm are likely with pockets of snow towards 40cm possible throughout the mountains. The highest snowfall totals are due to the position of the low creating an ‘up-sloping’ event where the snow is driven up and into the mountains and foothills allowing for significant accumulations. Snowfall ratios in this region will likely peak around 10:1 (10 inches of snow for 1 inch of water).

Down the mountains into the foothills and into the Central-Northern Rocky Mountains, Purcell Mountains, and Northern Selkirks Mountains, snowfall totals will be limited to 10-20cm with local totals towards 20-30cm. This includes Banff and Cranbrook, as well as, this region is highlighted in purple on the forecast map. In Extreme Southern Alberta, outside of the foothills will likely see between 10-20cm of snow. This includes the City of Lethbridge extending towards the southeast, also seen in purple on the forecast map. The snowfall totals may significantly drop off outside of the mountains and foothill regions as temperatures on Saturday through to Monday across the lower Prairie regions will be within 2 degrees of 0, meaning, snow may change over to rain at the lower elevations. This would significantly limit accumulations. The temperature change would be most prevalent in Extreme Southeastern Alberta into Southern Saskatchewan. Snowfall totals in this region are expected to be between 5-15cm are likely, which can be seen in purple on the forecast map, and circled. If temperatures trend cooler for this region, 10-20cm wouldn’t be out of the question for Southern Alberta and Southwestern Saskatchewan, extending as far in to include Shaunavon. Snowfall ratios will peak around the 3:1 and 5:1 range.

A general 5-15cm, locally up to 25cm, can be extended throughout the Rocky Mountains from the Lake Lousie region northwest into British Columbia extending towards Fort Nelson, as well as the Southern Selkirks Mountains and portions of the Monashees and Cascade Mountains. This would include Jasper and Grande Cache. This is highlighted in dark blue on the map. Across Southern Alberta and Southwestern Saskatchewan, a widespread 5-10cm, locally 15-20cm can be expected, also highlighted in dark blue. This includes Calgary, Medicine Hat, Swift Current, Rockglen, and Penticton. Elsewhere in light blue, flurries are likely. Snowfall totals around 5cm with local totals to 10-15cm are likely around Kelowna and Vernon. Snowfall totals will range under 5cm with local pockets sticking up to 10cm for portions of Saskatchewan and Central Alberta. Generally, the snow will melt-on-contact for a majority of the event for these highlighted regions, including Red Deer, Regina, and Saskatoon.

Environment Canada has issued widespread special weather statements across Southern, Western and Central Alberta, as well as, portions of British Columbia. Winter storm watches have been issued ahead of the snowstorm for Pincher Creek, Waterton Lakes National Park, Canmore, Okotoks, Cardston, and Fort Macleod regions.

Weather alerts can be monitored on Environment Canada’s website: https://weather.gc.ca/warnings/index_e.html

Projected snowfall totals between Friday, September 27th to Monday, September 30th

MANITOBA & ONTARIO SNOWFALL TOTALS

As the snowstorm producing low-pressure system crosses east, bringing the precipitation with it, light to moderate showers are likely across Southern Manitoba, and most of Northern Ontario. Alongside these showers, a band of flurries to light snow will cross portions of Central/Northern Manitoba into Far Northern Ontario. Snowfall totals less than or near 5cm are likely due to the snow mainly being melt-on-contact. A few pockets across Southwestern Manitoba and into Far Northern Ontario may see local totals towards 10cm. The highest confidence for locally higher totals is circled in red.

Projected snowfall totals between Monday, September 30th to Wednesday, October 2nd

BLOWING SNOW & STRONG WINDS

As the snow falls across the Southern Prairies, increasing wind speeds will bring the threat for hazardous traveling conditions in fast accumulating snow and falling snow. Current guidance suggests wind speeds will range from 30-50km/h across Southern Alberta and Southern Saskatchewan later in the day on Saturday extending through to Sunday morning. During the afternoon and evening on Sunday, winds will likely increase to 40-70km/h before 40-60km/h wind gusts settle in across Saskatchewan, Manitoba, and Ontario as the system weakens and phases out beginning mid-day Monday.

Blizzard conditions are possible.

Blowing snow and falling snow may make travel hazardous on Highway 1, 2, 3, and 4 across Southern Alberta and on Highway 1, 13, 18, 21, and 37 in Southern Saskatchewan.

Alberta

Much NEEDED RAINFALL & SNOW to Kick off the…

A potent upper-level system will stall all week across Alberta and Saskatchewan. The unsettled pattern will bring much-needed rainfall, thunderstorms, much below seasonal temperatures, and even accumulating S*** for Banff & Jasper.

Beneficial rainfall will persist all week in Alberta & Saskatchewan as an upper-level system stalls across the region. The heaviest rainfall is anticipated across Central Alberta where 50-75mm+ is expected by Friday. With much of that rain falling between Wednesday and Thursday. Some rainfall is in the forecast for drought-stricken High Level (Northern Alberta) & Moose Jaw (Southwestern Saskatchewan).

The much below seasonal temperatures and a soaking rainfall will make it feel more like the middle of October across the foothills. By Wednesday, temperatures will plummet nearly 10c below seasonal. Continuing through the day Thursday.

DAYS OF THUNDERSTORMS CONTINUE WITH THE THREAT OF SEVERE TUESDAY

Thunderstorms have been an almost daily occurrence over the last several days in the Prairies. The thunderstorm risk is expected to continue this week.

Monday: thunderstorms producing heavy downpours and small hail across Interior British Columbia and Northern Alberta.

Locally strong to severe thunderstorms expected across the yellow shaded area today.

Tuesday: better dynamics for potent thunderstorms across Southern Alberta (Calgary to Medicine Hat). Discrete cells or supercells could be capable of producing damaging winds and large hail.

Wednesday: daytime heating thunderstorm risk moves further East into Saskatchewan.

ACCUMULATING SNOW KICKS OFF SUMMER IN BANFF & JASPER

Between Wednesday night through Friday, accumulating up-sloping snow is expected over the high-elevation topography of Banff and Jasper National Parks. Believe or not, Friday is officially the first day of summer.

Alberta

Major Snowstorm Slices Through British Columbia & the Prairies

A Major Pattern reversal is underway across Western Canada. Cold air will descend from Northern Canada beginning Friday, coinciding with an extended period of heavy snowfall.

Our forecasting team will be closely monitoring the progression a major winter storm beginning Thursday evening. The Winter Storm isn’t expected to bring heavy snowfall rates, but rather an extended period of light-moderate snow over the next 48 hours.

The heaviest snowfall totals are expected through the Rockies; across British Columbia and Alberta. Where in excess of 50cm of snow is expected to fall. Even major cities, such as Edmonton won’t escape the wintry weather. With 30 or more centimeters projected to fall, over the next couple days.

Projected Snowfall Totals through Saturday PM
**Click map to make it zoomable.
Alberta

[UPDATED] Prairies: Not Your Usual Clipper System This Weekend

Alberta Clippers are synonymous for bringing snowfall lee of the Canadian Rockies, during December and January. These typically moisture-starved systems are fast movers, ejecting quickly out of Alberta, through the Southern Prairies – towards the Great Lakes. Read more about Alberta Clippers here.

A clipper is expected to form in Northern Alberta Saturday evening. Normally, these systems are more of a nuisance, accompanied by low snowfall totals and quick forward motion. On the contrary, this weekends system will flourish. Thanks to clashing temperatures and abundant Pacific moisture.

SNOWFALL TOTALS

Accumulations will vary greatly throughout the Prairies, bearing in mind the heaviest snow will fall along a narrow swath. Current guidance suggests close to 15cm across the northern extent of the darker shaded region (in our forecast map). Including, Northern & Central Alberta. The heaviest snow (~20cm) will fall across Extreme Southwest Manitoba and Southeast Saskatchewan. *Model guidance has increased snowfall totals further into Southwestern Manitoba, where Environment Canada has issued snowfall warnings. Several warnings now stretch across parts of Prairies.

There will be another swath of snow tracking down the Rockies, bringing 10-20cm. It looks like Calgary will be limited to less than 5cm through Friday. By Saturday, a steep contrast in temperature envelopes the Prairies. Calgary will see a high of 9c and sunshine. Whereas, Eastern Saskatchewan will still be below freezing.

Projected snowfall totals through this weekend.

STRONG WINDS & BLOWING SNOW

Winds pickup between the Grande Prairie – Whitecourt corridor early Saturday evening. Winds sustained at or over 30km/h, gusting 60-80km/h. Gusty winds will overspread much of Alberta and Southern Saskatchewan overnight Saturday into Sunday morning. The strongest wind gusts aren’t expected to coincide with the heaviest swath of snow. Still, freshly fallen snowfall, which is dry and light – will combine with gusty winds. Bringing local blowing and drifting snow. Stay tuned to weather advisories, or statements pertaining to any potential road closures.

Manitoba

More Snow to End the Work Week Across the…

A weak system stateside brings another round of snow for Southeastern Saskatchewan and Southwestern Manitoba Friday.

Wet snow and mixing will begin overnight tonight along the international border. Conditions will quickly deteriorate with accumulating snow beginning early Friday morning.

Weather Model depiction shows light to moderate snowfall at 6am, Friday morning.

Light to moderate snowfall will continue into the the afternoon.

Weather model depiction showing wet snowfall continuing into the afternoon.

Snowfall accumulations between 5-15cm is expected. Winnipeg will be on the mixing line between rain and wet snow by the afternoon. 2-4cm is possible.

UPDATE: the 4-8cm swath may encompass municipalities further North and East in Manitoba. With warmer temperatures, actual ground accumulation will lead to trace amounts.

Projected snowfall totals through Friday.

Prepare for an extended commute and winter travel conditions Friday. 

Alberta

Environment Canada Issues Frost Advisories in the Prairies

Environment Canada has issued a frost advisory for much of Southern Saskatchewan and Central Alberta. 

Damage to sensitive crops is possible tonight.

SASKATCHEWAN:

Frost may damage some crops in frost-prone areas.

A ridge of high pressure building over the prairies will bring clear skies and cold overnight lows to Saskatchewan Tuesday night. Overnight lows are expected to be between 0 and -3 Celsius by Wednesday morning.

Special Weather Statement for Saskatchewan

ALBERTA:

Frost may damage some crops in frost-prone areas.

Overnight lows are expected to reach near the freezing mark. Frost is possible overnight.

Take preventative measures to protect frost-sensitive plants and trees.

Frost advisories are issued when temperatures are expected to reach the freezing mark during the growing season, leading to potential damage and destruction to plants and crops.

Special Weather Statement for Alberta

Manitoba

A Weekend of Severe Thunderstorms in the Prairies Persists

Isolated severe thunderstorms expected today (Sunday, June 10th) in Saskatchewan & Manitoba.

Isolated severe thunderstorms are expected to develop in Central and Eastern Saskatchewan beginning by the mid-afternoon and persisting well into the evening hours in Western Manitoba.

We have highlighted an area in orange where the greatest risk develops. Regions is yellow can expect primarily non-severe showers and thunderstorms. Note: this risk continues into Western Manitoba.

Risk factors associated with these thunderstorms include: large hail, torrential rainfall, frequent lightning, and damaging wind gusts in excess of 100km/h.

Much cooler and less humid conditions are expected for Monday.

Severe thunderstorm risk for today expected in the orange section of our map. 

ANALYSIS

A surface low will decent across Southwestern Saskatchewan early in the morning Sunday. The first low has led to rain and heavy thunderstorms in Southwestern areas of the province early this morning. At the same time, a secondary low pressure center/vort max will be deepening as it approaches Western Saskatchewan during the afternoon. A trough in the Jet-stream will be progressing Eastwards across Saskatchewan during the period.

A eastward progressing front associated with the deepening low-pressure system, will act as a trigger from the mid-afternoon through the late evening – across Central and Eastern Saskatchewan.

Deep moisture transport aided by a 30-40kt low-level Jet out of the Southeast will result in dew-points in the high teens. Concurrently, temperatures will likely rise into the high 20s. Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) will likely build above 2000 J/KG across the warm sector, providing plentiful energy for strong thunderstorms. Warmer air aloft (a “cap”) will have to erode before storms can erupt – perhaps after peak energy.

Marginal wind shear and helicity readings, little veering with height, and a high LCL is expected to limited any tornado activity despite a south-easterly surface wind. The south-easterly flow and storm mode/track may allow for “training” – which heightens the threat for localized flooding.

Environment Canada (PASPC) has issued a map highlighting Southeastern Saskatchewan and Western Manitoba in a “moderate” risk for severe thunderstorms. Primary hazards include: 110km/h wind-gusts and 3-5cm hail. NOTE: these maps are still in the experimental stage. 

Near the low center (which is expected to exist in the North Battleford corridor), a soaking rainfall and heavy thunderstorms is expected. This activity should remain non-severe. Rainfall amounts of 15-35mm are expected.

The risk for severe thunderstorms continues Eastwards into Manitoba. Reloading again, for Manitoba and Northwestern Ontario on Monday.

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