Tag: heavy snowfall

Ontario

How a Major Blizzard Stateside Will Impact Ontario

An area of low-pressure sliding out of Colorado will undergo explosive intensification through the day Wednesday. This will be an blockbuster blizzard for portions of the Upper Midwest including South Dakota & Minnesota. 40-60cm+ of snow concurrent with 70-90km/h winds will cripple the region.

BLIZZARD WEAKENS AS IT MOVES INTO NORTHWESTERN ONTARIO

The explosive Colorado Low that will cripple South Dakota, will thankfully be weakening as it approaches Ontario. Snow will move into the Thunder Bay, Nipigon, Atikokan, Upsala area before midnight Thursday. Accumulating snow will combine with gusty winds between 40-55km/h, through Thursday night and Friday. It will be a good day to stay home and off the roads if you can.

Moderate to heavy snow transitioning to rain across Northeastern Ontario. Northwestern Ontario sees all snow from this system. Click to navigate the map and find your region.

Wawa to Timmins will see more ice pellets and wet snow, than rain. A transition to rain showers is expected throughout Friday Afternoon.

Kapuskasing to Hearst will remain as snow, where 15-20cm is expected to fall.

SOUTHERN ONTARIO IMPACTS

Strong wind, a surge of warmer air and rainfall will be the story across Southern Ontario Friday. A cool and partly-cloudy day Thursday, with patchy mixed precipitation. Largely confined to Southwestern Ontario.

Strong wind anticipated across Southwestern Ontario Friday morning. Strong Southeasterly gusts between 70-80km/h is expected north of Lake Erie and East of Lake Huron.

Temperatures in the afternoon will spike into the double digits across Southern Ontario. The Nations Capital Region will see the temperature climb near 9c. The trade-off will be a lousy day with occasional rain or showers Thursday. There is even a risk for localized thunderstorms early in the day Friday.

New Brunswick

Bomb Cyclone Threatens Damaging Windstorm, Snow & Heavy Rain…

A weatherbomb is rapidly strengthening Tuesday off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Bringing hurricane-force winds, significant rain & lighting just off-shore. This system will undergo bombogenesis as it tracks up the Eastern Seaboard, through the Gulf of St. Lawrence into Labrador. 

Significant rainfall & snowfall accompanied by damaging winds gusting over 100km/h is anticipated. The most tempestuous conditions being felt across the Maritimes Wednesday afternoon & evening. For Newfoundland & Labrador conditions deteriorate rapidly overnight Wednesday. Persisting through most of the day Thursday.

DAMAGING WIND THREAT

Damaging winds will be the main story with this powerful storm. Atmospheric pressure is expected to drop 28mb within 24 hours. An expansive – strengthening wind field will result. Hurricane-force winds (gusts over 120km/h) expected along the Western coast of Newfoundland & Cape Breton Island.

Les Suetes winds gusting up 160 km/h are forecast to develop Wednesday afternoon, shifting southwesterly before dissipating. Wreckhouse winds could peak between 160-180km/h.

Click to navigate the wind impact map.

SIGNIFICANT WIND DRIVEN RAINFALL FOR COASTAL NOVA SCOTIA

Environment Canada has issued a Rainfall warning across Nova Scotia. The agency is warning up to 70mm of rain could fall, in the hardest hit regions along coastal Nova Scotia.

Rain at times heavy will develop early Wednesday morning over southwestern Nova Scotia and quickly spread to the remainder of the province by Wednesday afternoon. The rain will be mixed with snow to start over parts of mainland Nova Scotia Wednesday morning. Over Cape Breton, the rain will likely be preceded by a period of snow over some areas.

Rainfall amounts will be highest over Atlantic coastal regions of mainland Nova Scotia where 50 to 70 millimetres are forecast. Elsewhere, 25 to 40 millimetres of rain is expected.

Heavy downpours can cause flash floods and water pooling on roads. Localized flooding in low-lying areas is possible.

SNOWFALL ACROSS NEW BRUNSWICK & BLIZZARD CONDITIONS ACROSS LABRADOR

Environment Canada has issued several warning across New Brunswick. This is what they wrote in their statement. Snow will begin Wednesday morning over southwestern New Brunswick and then spread quickly across the province by noon. The snow will likely mix with rain in the afternoon. Snowfall amounts of up to 10 cm are possible. Over eastern regions of the province, snowfall amounts in excess of 15 cm are likely and snowfall warnings are in effect there. Along the Fundy coast, rainfall amounts near 25 mm are possible and rainfall warnings are in effect there. Northwestern New Brunswick will only receive light amounts of precipitation from this system.

Western Newfoundland will have to contend with sea-effect snow and blizzard-like conditions through the day Thursday. 5-15cm of accumulation is expected by Thursday evening. Heavy flurries and snowsqualls may continue Thursday overnight and Friday.

This will be a major winter storm for Labrador. Who has been no stranger to significant storms this season. Winter refuses to relinquish its icy grip. 25-40cm of fresh snow concurrent with 90km/h+ winds & blizzard conditions.

Alberta

Major Snowstorm Slices Through British Columbia & the Prairies

A Major Pattern reversal is underway across Western Canada. Cold air will descend from Northern Canada beginning Friday, coinciding with an extended period of heavy snowfall.

Our forecasting team will be closely monitoring the progression a major winter storm beginning Thursday evening. The Winter Storm isn’t expected to bring heavy snowfall rates, but rather an extended period of light-moderate snow over the next 48 hours.

The heaviest snowfall totals are expected through the Rockies; across British Columbia and Alberta. Where in excess of 50cm of snow is expected to fall. Even major cities, such as Edmonton won’t escape the wintry weather. With 30 or more centimeters projected to fall, over the next couple days.

Projected Snowfall Totals through Saturday PM
**Click map to make it zoomable.
Manitoba

Tale of Two Seasons: Heavy Snow, Rain, & Summer…

An area of low pressure will strengthen as it tracks through the Upper Midwestern United States. Bringing accumulating snow and gusty winds across Northwestern Ontario. Summer-like heat & humdity returns to Southern Ontario.

TIMING & ACCUMULATIONS 

Snow flurries will begin mixing in along Highway 17 late Wednesday evening. With wet snow falling by Thursday morning. By Thursday afternoon, anywhere along and south of Highway 11 will likely be seeing rain. 

North of Lake Superior, precipitation will fall as a cold rain with gusty winds. Including the Thunder Bay area, where cold rain and gusty winds will lead to a miserable day. 

Projected snowfall divisible by Postal Code. 
PostalCast©: NW. ON SNOWSTORM – Wednesday through Thursday
— MOST Impacted Locales (Based on First 3 Digits of a Postal Code) —
P0L (10-15cm for Southern Regions; 15-25cm for Northern)
P0T (<5cm near Superior; 25-30cm+ for Northern Regions)
P0V (<5cm for Northern Regions; 15-25cm for Southern)
P0W (10-15cm)
P0X (15-20cm)
P0Y (15-20cm)
P8N (20-25cm+)
P8T (20-25cm+)
P9A (8-15cm)
P9N (10-20cm)

By Wednesday afternoon or late evening, cold air will wrap around the deepening system. Heavy snowfall will begin accumulating in a line from Kenora to Dryden to Sioux Lookout to Pickle Lake. Continuing into extreme Southeastern Manitoba. Moderate to heavy snowfall and gusty winds will persist, increasing in coverage across Northwestern Ontario through the day Thursday. 

Projected amounts are subject to change based on the track & timing of the low + Hurricane Michael. Current guidance suggests a large swath of 20-30cm. 30-40cm could fall locally.

Preliminary snowfall projections will be updated throughout the week.

Actual accumulations will be largely dependant upon key factors: track of the low, temperature, and snowfall ratios. Moisture won’t be an issue with tropical moisture from Hurricane Michael. 

HEAVY RAINFALL 

While Northwestern Ontario deals with heavy snow, Northeastern Ontario will be dealing with heavy rainfall. A large swath of 50-75mm is expected East of Lake Superior. 

THE TALE OF TWO SEASONS 

As Northern Ontario deals with heavy rain and snow, Southern Ontario will get one last blast of summer. Temperatures Wednesday will likely be soaring into the mid or high-20s. With abundant humidity making it feel into the 30s. Forecast temperature & humidity readings will challenge all-time October records Tuesday and Wednesday.