Tag: Damaging wind

New Brunswick

Bomb Cyclone Threatens Damaging Windstorm, Snow & Heavy Rain…

A weatherbomb is rapidly strengthening Tuesday off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Bringing hurricane-force winds, significant rain & lighting just off-shore. This system will undergo bombogenesis as it tracks up the Eastern Seaboard, through the Gulf of St. Lawrence into Labrador. 

Significant rainfall & snowfall accompanied by damaging winds gusting over 100km/h is anticipated. The most tempestuous conditions being felt across the Maritimes Wednesday afternoon & evening. For Newfoundland & Labrador conditions deteriorate rapidly overnight Wednesday. Persisting through most of the day Thursday.

DAMAGING WIND THREAT

Damaging winds will be the main story with this powerful storm. Atmospheric pressure is expected to drop 28mb within 24 hours. An expansive – strengthening wind field will result. Hurricane-force winds (gusts over 120km/h) expected along the Western coast of Newfoundland & Cape Breton Island.

Les Suetes winds gusting up 160 km/h are forecast to develop Wednesday afternoon, shifting southwesterly before dissipating. Wreckhouse winds could peak between 160-180km/h.

Click to navigate the wind impact map.

SIGNIFICANT WIND DRIVEN RAINFALL FOR COASTAL NOVA SCOTIA

Environment Canada has issued a Rainfall warning across Nova Scotia. The agency is warning up to 70mm of rain could fall, in the hardest hit regions along coastal Nova Scotia.

Rain at times heavy will develop early Wednesday morning over southwestern Nova Scotia and quickly spread to the remainder of the province by Wednesday afternoon. The rain will be mixed with snow to start over parts of mainland Nova Scotia Wednesday morning. Over Cape Breton, the rain will likely be preceded by a period of snow over some areas.

Rainfall amounts will be highest over Atlantic coastal regions of mainland Nova Scotia where 50 to 70 millimetres are forecast. Elsewhere, 25 to 40 millimetres of rain is expected.

Heavy downpours can cause flash floods and water pooling on roads. Localized flooding in low-lying areas is possible.

SNOWFALL ACROSS NEW BRUNSWICK & BLIZZARD CONDITIONS ACROSS LABRADOR

Environment Canada has issued several warning across New Brunswick. This is what they wrote in their statement. Snow will begin Wednesday morning over southwestern New Brunswick and then spread quickly across the province by noon. The snow will likely mix with rain in the afternoon. Snowfall amounts of up to 10 cm are possible. Over eastern regions of the province, snowfall amounts in excess of 15 cm are likely and snowfall warnings are in effect there. Along the Fundy coast, rainfall amounts near 25 mm are possible and rainfall warnings are in effect there. Northwestern New Brunswick will only receive light amounts of precipitation from this system.

Western Newfoundland will have to contend with sea-effect snow and blizzard-like conditions through the day Thursday. 5-15cm of accumulation is expected by Thursday evening. Heavy flurries and snowsqualls may continue Thursday overnight and Friday.

This will be a major winter storm for Labrador. Who has been no stranger to significant storms this season. Winter refuses to relinquish its icy grip. 25-40cm of fresh snow concurrent with 90km/h+ winds & blizzard conditions.

Manitoba

Heavy Thunderstorms Expected in Southeastern Prairies

Widespread heavy to severe thunderstorms likely late this evening – continuing into the overnight hours in Southern Manitoba and Southeastern Saskatchewan. 

 

A stationary front this afternoon in Northern Dakota will separate warm, moist air south of the international border, with warm, drier air in Southern Manitoba. Along this front, there is a risk of isolated severe storms in North Dakota this afternoon – staying stateside. 

A deepening system out of Rockies will trigger severe thunderstorms stateside and a second, more significant/widespread risk of thunderstorms this evening/overnight.

Environment Canada (PASPC) Thunderstorm Outlook. Valid 12pm Thursday to 6am Friday. Highlighting the risk for severe thunderstorms. Note: these forecast maps are still experimental and are not currently operational on Environment Canadas website. 

A second wave which is forecast to develop late in the day, stateside, is the one we are watching closely. Moist and unstable air creeps across the border into Southeastern Saskatchewan and Southern Manitoba this evening. The northern extent of the second wave is expected to cross the international border into Southeast Saskatchewan and Southern Manitoba sometime around midnight. 

There is still some uncertainty regarding evolution and timing of this convective complex. Such complexes also known as MCSs or MCCs – Mesoscale Convective Complex; are notorious for producing intense frequent lightning, flash flooding, and damaging to destructive winds. Large hail is also a possibility, during the initial storm development.

The risk moves out of Southeastern Manitoba into Northwestern Ontario pre-dawn Friday into Friday morning.

We will be monitoring the situation attentively into this evening and overnight. 

Ontario

Severe Thunderstorm Risk Builds in Southern Ontario

Showers and a risk of severe thunderstorms for Southern Ontario. Heavy rainfall from East of Lake Superior to the Quebec border Wednesday (June 13th, 2018).

A strengthening low pressure system will track East of Lake Superior through the Nickel Belt Wednesday, bringing a risk for heavy rainfall for Northern Ontario and a risk of severe thunderstorms in Southern Ontario. 

WHAT’S EXPECTED 

A swath near the low track, from East of Lake Superior to the Quebec border will likely see rainfall amounts of 25-50mm between Wednesday morning to evening. 

Further south, across Southern Ontario – there will be 2 rounds of precipitation. The first, along a warm front as it edges north into Southwestern Ontario, bringing scattered showers Tuesday evening through Wednesday morning. Once the warm front moves north, there will be a clearing allowing for sunny breaks and energy to build ahead of a cold front acting as a trigger for thunderstorms Wednesday afternoon. Some of these thunderstorms may be severe with damaging winds as the primary threat.

A window for a low tornado threat is possible from mid to late afternoon in our red highlighted area. The greatest threat will be along a “triple-point” – between 1pm and 6pm. This region may expand to include municipalities near the Lake Ontario shoreline. 

Environment Canada (OSPC) is calling for a “moderate” risk of severe thunderstorms. The primary threats according to their risk map is damaging winds up to 100km/h. Please note: these maps are still in the experimental stage. 

STRONG WINDS

After the passage of the cold front the low will continue to deepen as it moves into Quebec. Strong wrap around winds will develop Wednesday evening and overnight. Gusts between 60-80km/h are expected across much of Southwestern, and South-central Ontario. Localized gusts to 90km/h are possible in higher elevation South of Georgian Bay, as well as, near the lakeshore. 

Nova Scotia

Powerful Winds; Fierce Waves for Southern Nova Scotia

A broad area of low pressure is forecast to coalesce into a powerful coastal low through Friday. A new low pressure center will develop near Cape Cod this morning, intensifying into an expansive coastal wind storm.

Strong north-easterly winds will intensify throughout Friday.

Along the Atlantic coastline adjoining Queens to Shelburne county, wind gusts ranging between 90-100 km/h are expected by Friday evening. Elsewhere, along the coast from Halifax to Yarmouth, peak wind gusts of 80 to 90km/h are expected. Winds should diminish through the day Saturday, as the low translates south-east.

At this point in time, it appears any heavy rainfall associated with this system will remain off shore.

Pounding surf, fierce waves & higher than usual water

Coastal communities expanding across Southern Nova Scotia from Halifax to Yarmouth (including Lunenburg), can expect wave heights between 5 and 6 meters Friday and Saturday. On Saturday morning, high waves and pounding surf are forecast to creep north – encompassing the remainder of the eastern Nova Scotia coastline. Higher than usual water levels are expected to coincide with high tide both Friday and Saturday, raising coastal flood concerns.

Environment Canada Issues Wind Warnings and Special Weather Statements ahead of the storm.

The weather agency noted on Thursday that “astronomical high tides will be running high during this period of elevated water levels adding to a risk of coastal flooding”.

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