Category: Nova Scotia

New Brunswick

Powerful Nor’easter Looms for the Maritimes; Tempestuous Conditions Inevitable


Past Updates

Nor’easter for the Maritimes.

Significant snowstorm will impact the Maritimes once again: Tuesday and Wednesday time-frame.

A low pressure system moving near the Eastern Seaboard of the United States will target the Maritimes this upcoming work-week. Current indications are now such that a significant snowstorm is probable, particularly for much of New Brunswick and especially the NE corridor of the province.

High confidence exists that this storm will produce a widespread swath of 20-30cm+ across New Brunswick, with slightly lesser amounts along the Bay of Fundy shoreline. Additionally, due to a surge of milder Atlantic air, a mix of snow/rain will lead to less significant amounts for coastal regions of Nova Scotia, Eastern PEI and most of Cape Breton.

While temperatures will be slightly mild at the surface and @ 925mb, further upper atmospheric temperatures are still quite chilly, therefore there is almost a nil chance of freezing rain/ice-pellets.

Subsequently, ‘dry air’ is non-existent in this case at the surface, and moisture will indeed remain high.

Snow ratios will not be exceptionally high, however, based on the current track of the low pressure system, surface temperatures will remain slightly cooler across Eastern and Northeastern New Brunswick, thereby allowing for higher totals than their surrounding counterparts.

Watch for gusty winds/localized blowing snow for Eastern and Northeastern sections of New Brunswick up to 75km/h. Elsewhere, gusts up to 65km/h is probable.

While snow will be somewhat limited, watch for very strong wind gusts for Nova Scotia near the coast up to 110km/h.

Updated Information: March 13th, 2018 @ 7:00PM ADT

Nor’easter continues to loom for much of the Maritime provinces. High confidence still exists for a significant impact.

Current indications support particularly major impact for Eastern and Northeastern sections (especially) of New Brunswick where 30-40cm of snow could accumulate.

The track of the low will now move more-so slightly off-shore, rather than ‘hug’ the Eastern Seaboard of the USA, thereby allowing for further intensification; milder air will infiltrate the immediate Nova Scotia coast-line, thereby limiting snowfall amounts.

There is some level of confidence that regions along the Greenwood-Kentville (NS) corridor could now receive 15-20cm instead of the 8-15cm as previously posted. However, because confidence is not entirely high we have decided to only inform individuals, rather than updating our map.

Highest confidence continues to exist for NE New Brunswick receiving the highest impact from this system (particularly just N and NW of Moncton, through Bathurst).

Heavy snow will somewhat blanket coastal regions of Nova Scotia initially, however, it is important to note that a transition to rain will occur. While snowfall may total 10-15cm across coastal regions of Nova Scotia, it will melt quickly through the Pre-Dawn and the morning of Wednesday (March 14th).

Continue to return to this post every hour as updated information will be released as the event draws near.

Please stay tuned, as we at TCW are monitoring this situation attentively.

Drive safe and always be alert during winter conditions.

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New Brunswick

[UPDATED] Unsettled Pattern Arrives in Eastern Canada

Unsettled week ahead for the Maritimes to Ontario, including Quebec.

A formidable late winter snow storm has dropped impressive snowfall totals across parts of the Canadian Prairies in recent days. The same storm system has weakened and stalled over the Great Lakes, while aiding in the formation of a new surface low that tracked into the Maritimes.

The newly-formed system tracked up the Eastern Seaboard concurrently as a trough sits over the Great Lakes, becoming a weather maker for much of Eastern Canada.

ONTARIO

Predominantly cloudy conditions, with periods of flurries and wet snow continues Thursday and Friday across Southern and Northeastern Ontario. Trace amounts are expected for most, but parts of Southwest Ontario and Eastern Ontario could see several day totals approach 10-20cm. Actual ground accumulation will be less considering melting and settling.

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A more substantial in addition to localized snowfall threat will develop Wednesday morning, spanning parts of southwest Ontario. As a result of moisture enhancement off of the Great Lakes and a stalled trough over the region. A few wet centimetres is likely to accumulate east of Lake Huron. The unsettled pattern continues into Wednesday, Thursday and perhaps Friday. 5-15 centimetres of accumulation spanning the work week is expected. Highest totals away from the lakeshore and in regions of higher elevation.

MARITIMES

A moisture-laden system approaching the Bay of Fundy will continue to spread snow and rain across the Maritimes. Moderate snowfall continues to impact central Nova Scotia, PEI and New Brunswick. An additional 3-8cm of wet snow is expected to accumulate today, before this low tracks north. Precipitation will likely end as rain showers as temperatures warm. The heaviest totals from this system will be across a swath of central New Brunswick where 15-20cm is expected.

A second powerful storm system is expected to develop Friday lasting into Sunday. Strong winds gusting 50-70km/h and heavy snowfall amounting to an additional 10-25cm will be a concern.

Snow is expected to begin across Nova Scotia and PEI, transitioning to rain as the warm sector of the storm continues north throughout the day Thursday. Highest accumulations are expected in Cape Breton. Elsewhere, several wet centimetres will fall before a changeover to rainfall. There is still some uncertainties in exact track of this system(s). Once forecast confident increases, we will publish a region specific forecast for the maritimes promptly.

Primarily snowfall is expected in central and northern New Brunswick, with a changeover to rainfall near the Bay of Fundy.

QUEBEC

Flurries and light snowfall continue in Southwestern Quebec. A retrograding coastal low moving west-wards towards the Saint Lawrence river Thursday into Friday morning, will being heavier snow to Southeast Quebec and the Eastern Townships. Total accumulations are expected to be in the 10-20cm range by Friday evening.

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Nova Scotia

Powerful Winds; Fierce Waves for Southern Nova Scotia

A broad area of low pressure is forecast to coalesce into a powerful coastal low through Friday. A new low pressure center will develop near Cape Cod this morning, intensifying into an expansive coastal wind storm.

Strong north-easterly winds will intensify throughout Friday.

Along the Atlantic coastline adjoining Queens to Shelburne county, wind gusts ranging between 90-100 km/h are expected by Friday evening. Elsewhere, along the coast from Halifax to Yarmouth, peak wind gusts of 80 to 90km/h are expected. Winds should diminish through the day Saturday, as the low translates south-east.

At this point in time, it appears any heavy rainfall associated with this system will remain off shore.

Pounding surf, fierce waves & higher than usual water

Coastal communities expanding across Southern Nova Scotia from Halifax to Yarmouth (including Lunenburg), can expect wave heights between 5 and 6 meters Friday and Saturday. On Saturday morning, high waves and pounding surf are forecast to creep north – encompassing the remainder of the eastern Nova Scotia coastline. Higher than usual water levels are expected to coincide with high tide both Friday and Saturday, raising coastal flood concerns.

Environment Canada Issues Wind Warnings and Special Weather Statements ahead of the storm.

The weather agency noted on Thursday that “astronomical high tides will be running high during this period of elevated water levels adding to a risk of coastal flooding”.

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Newfoundland and Labrador

Snowy and Blizzard Conditions for Parts of Newfoundland


On Monday PM into early Wednesday, a low pressure system will sweep across the Maritimes, strengthen, and target mainly Southern and Central Newfoundland with wind and heavy snow.

As the day progresses on Monday, a strengthening low will provide ample moisture for especially Southern portions of Newfoundland with upwards of 30cm as a possibility.

The heaviest snowfall will occur mostly through the night on Monday, lingering into Tuesday, with slight residual amounts into early Wednesday.

Snow-days for regions such as Burgeo and St. Alban’s are probable on Tuesday and/or Wednesday.

Reduced visibility, alongside rapidly accumulating snowfall will be possible for Southern and Central portions of Newfoundland.

Winds up to 65-75km/h will indeed and further cause travel headaches.

At TransCanada Weather we urge you to monitor the weather closely and be prepared for longer commute times and/or travel delays.

For hourly and live storm updates around the clock, follow us on Twitter.
https://twitter.com/TransCANWeather