Category: Newfoundland and Labrador

New Brunswick

Texas Low: Severe Outbreak Precedes Potent Storm for Eastern…

A significant trough crossing the Guadelupe Mountains will drive the development of a potent area of low-pressure across Texas Saturday. Favorable conditions for the development of severe thunderstorms, will exist along the warm front axis; ahead of a vigorous cold front. This will be significant “severe weather event” for Northern Louisiana, Southern Arkansas, Western Mississippi, and Eastern Texas. Reloading for a second day of severe weather, across the Eastern United States.

Moisture laden low developing in Texas bringing severe thunderstorms. With impacts across Eastern Canada to end the week. Persisting into early next week.

During the day Sunday, the low is forecast to take a northeast hook towards the lower Great Lakes bringing a plume of rain and snow for Southern/Central Ontario & Southern Quebec.

Atlantic Canada is poised to see the most tempestuous conditions, with rapid deepening of the low-pressure center late Monday. This system will be a heavy-rain story for the Maritimes. On the contrary, Newfoundland could see heavy snow, significant freezing rain and strong winds.

COOL, WET & LOUSY COUPLE DAYS FOR SOUTHERN ONTARIO

Get out and enjoy the abundant sunshine and warm temperatures Saturday. A messy, moisture-laden system out of Texas will deliver below seasonal temperatures, a soaking rainfall, mixed precipitation and accumulating wet snow. The heaviest rainfall will be situated along the Lake Ontario shoreline into the Niagara Region. The heaviest of the snowfall will be seen across parts of Central Ontario – through cottage country.

A lousy system for the Great Lakes. Below seasonal temperatures, a soaking rainfall and more snow expected.

SIGNIFICANT RAINFALL & GUSTY WINDS FOR THE MARITIMES

Significant rainfall will encompass much of Nova Scotia, the Bay of Fundy region in New Brunswick & Prince Edward Island. There is still considerable uncertainty how this low will develop in the Maritimes. Current projections have most of the precipitation falling as rainfall. As much as, 40-75mm of rain is possible, between Sunday night through Tuesday morning.

Click to navigate a larger image of the map.

POTENTIAL ‘WEATHERBOMB’ FOR NEWFOUNDLAND

The system is expected to undergo rapid deepening Monday night. Slowing as it transverses through Gulf of St. Lawrence. A strengthening wind field along the Northwestern coast, persists all-day Tuesday. Refinements to the forecast will come throughout the coming days. Nevertheless, this is looking like a potent system for Newfoundland.

We are becoming increasingly concerned regarding a freezing rain threat for the north coast of Newfoundland. Including Fogo Island, Bonavista North & Green Bay. 10-15mm+ of freezing rain, ending as snow and strong winds could bring localized power outages.

Heavy snowfall will be the story across Northwestern Newfoundland with as much as 20-40cm falling over the hardest hit areas. Concurrent, with strong winds leading to blowing and drifting snow.

New Brunswick

Bomb Cyclone Threatens Damaging Windstorm, Snow & Heavy Rain…

A weatherbomb is rapidly strengthening Tuesday off Cape Hatteras, North Carolina. Bringing hurricane-force winds, significant rain & lighting just off-shore. This system will undergo bombogenesis as it tracks up the Eastern Seaboard, through the Gulf of St. Lawrence into Labrador. 

Significant rainfall & snowfall accompanied by damaging winds gusting over 100km/h is anticipated. The most tempestuous conditions being felt across the Maritimes Wednesday afternoon & evening. For Newfoundland & Labrador conditions deteriorate rapidly overnight Wednesday. Persisting through most of the day Thursday.

DAMAGING WIND THREAT

Damaging winds will be the main story with this powerful storm. Atmospheric pressure is expected to drop 28mb within 24 hours. An expansive – strengthening wind field will result. Hurricane-force winds (gusts over 120km/h) expected along the Western coast of Newfoundland & Cape Breton Island.

Les Suetes winds gusting up 160 km/h are forecast to develop Wednesday afternoon, shifting southwesterly before dissipating. Wreckhouse winds could peak between 160-180km/h.

Click to navigate the wind impact map.

SIGNIFICANT WIND DRIVEN RAINFALL FOR COASTAL NOVA SCOTIA

Environment Canada has issued a Rainfall warning across Nova Scotia. The agency is warning up to 70mm of rain could fall, in the hardest hit regions along coastal Nova Scotia.

Rain at times heavy will develop early Wednesday morning over southwestern Nova Scotia and quickly spread to the remainder of the province by Wednesday afternoon. The rain will be mixed with snow to start over parts of mainland Nova Scotia Wednesday morning. Over Cape Breton, the rain will likely be preceded by a period of snow over some areas.

Rainfall amounts will be highest over Atlantic coastal regions of mainland Nova Scotia where 50 to 70 millimetres are forecast. Elsewhere, 25 to 40 millimetres of rain is expected.

Heavy downpours can cause flash floods and water pooling on roads. Localized flooding in low-lying areas is possible.

SNOWFALL ACROSS NEW BRUNSWICK & BLIZZARD CONDITIONS ACROSS LABRADOR

Environment Canada has issued several warning across New Brunswick. This is what they wrote in their statement. Snow will begin Wednesday morning over southwestern New Brunswick and then spread quickly across the province by noon. The snow will likely mix with rain in the afternoon. Snowfall amounts of up to 10 cm are possible. Over eastern regions of the province, snowfall amounts in excess of 15 cm are likely and snowfall warnings are in effect there. Along the Fundy coast, rainfall amounts near 25 mm are possible and rainfall warnings are in effect there. Northwestern New Brunswick will only receive light amounts of precipitation from this system.

Western Newfoundland will have to contend with sea-effect snow and blizzard-like conditions through the day Thursday. 5-15cm of accumulation is expected by Thursday evening. Heavy flurries and snowsqualls may continue Thursday overnight and Friday.

This will be a major winter storm for Labrador. Who has been no stranger to significant storms this season. Winter refuses to relinquish its icy grip. 25-40cm of fresh snow concurrent with 90km/h+ winds & blizzard conditions.

Alberta

Canada Winter 2018-2019 Forecast: Frigid Prairies and Significant Lake-Effect…

Canada-Wide 2018-2019 Preliminary Forecast.
Finalized Outlook by Christmas!

Frigid Air and Heavy Squalls Loom

The winter across Canada for many this season is expected to be cold, particularly for Saskatchewan, Manitoba, Ontario, and Quebec.

Through careful analysis of meteorological data, we have compiled a preliminary forecast for the winter across Canada for this winter. We will issue an updated version, should the situation warrant, in December.

For many places, we expect an early start to winter. Some places in Manitoba have already received accumulating snow. For Southern Ontario, we expect accumulating snow perhaps as early as late October.

Key Highlights
– Frigid & Snowy Winter for Saskatchewan and Manitoba
– Cold & Stormy for Ontario and Quebec
– Potentially Historic Squalls for Great Lakes (NW and W Flow)
– Several Winter Storms for Maritimes and NL but Not All Snow

British Columbia
For this winter BC is expected to receive a relatively typical winter season. Normal precipitation amounts with normal temperatures will be present in the region. While a few colder outbreaks are certainly likely with some snow getting into the mainland, we expect nothing out of the ordinary.

Prairies
From Alberta to Saskatchewan to Manitoba, we expect a frigid winter overall. While Alberta is expected to receive moderating temperatures throughout the winter from Pacific air flows, Saskatchewan and Manitoba are expected to be exceptionally cold, and at times, record-breaking with several rounds of ‘deep-freezes’. Precipitation is expected to be slightly above normal for Alberta, and above normal for Saskatchewan and Manitoba.

Ontario & Quebec
Ontario is expected to be overall, cold this winter. Northwestern and Northern Ontario are expected to parallel the frigid air likewise to the Prairies. With the set-up of the storm track this winter, we expect more rounds of Colorado and Texas lows to infiltrate the Great Lakes and Southern Quebec for the first time in what has seemed to be a number of years.
The cold air from Manitoba and Saskatchewan will provide flourishing variables to allow a well-above and significantly active lake-effect season in an NW to W flow. Preliminary indications represent a repeat of December 2010 across the region.

Quebec is expected to receive above-normal snowfall this year as several storms track through the interior NE of the USA this year. Temperatures will become vastly more frigid through Northern regions of the province.


Maritimes and Newfoundland & Labrador
While the Maritimes and NL are expected to be active this year, it is expected at times, slightly milder air will target the regions, therefore, not all systems this year will be snow-makers. The regions will certainly be stormy this year, but several storms may end up more of a ‘wintry-mix’, rather than snowstorms. Temperatures will be slightly more moderated at times, although at times, cold bouts are certainly likely.

Territories
The Yukon is expected to receive slight benefits from Pacific air and a slight ridge at times over Western Canada/Western USA, providing relief at times relative to the typical winter in the region. Conversely, NWT and Nunavut are expected to receive normal precipitation


– TCW

Newfoundland and Labrador

Powerful Storm to Develop Across Newfoundland & Labrador Tuesday

A seasonably-deep low pressure system will develop rapidly Tuesday; impacting Newfoundland & Labrador.

The central pressure is forecast to deepen an incredible 22mb in 24 hours, almost reaching the criteria to be considered a “weatherbomb”.
#NLwx

Far, and largely unpopulated, Northeastern Labrador will see snow mix-in. Accumulating snow is possible in Greenland.

Expect pounding surf of 3-5m and beach erosion in Labrador. As well as, heavy rainfall and strong winds. Strongest winds to 90km/h will remain well off the coast.

Projected Wave Heights

NEWFOUNDLAND:

Western sections will see locally-heavy rainfall with this system. The biggest weather story is focused on a sudden change in weather pattern.

Warm & humid conditions dominating the Province will end, at least temporarily, with the passage of a cold front.

A cooler much-drier airmass will move across the province West to East throughout Tuesday.

 

Alberta

Updated Summer Forecast: Heat Expected to Dominate Ontario, Manitoba…


2018 Canada Summer Outlook and Higlights Depicted Below —- July and August

Key Highlights

– Heat Builds for Northern, Southwestern, Southern, Central and Eastern Ontario and Southern Quebec Beginning June 29th.

– Many Canadians are Expected to Receive a Warm or Hot July 1st (Canada Day!).

– Unusually Dry for Ontario and Quebec.

– Intermittent Rounds of Isolated Severe Thunderstorms for MB, ON, and QC.

– Decently Warm for SK and AB; Some Periods of Very Warm to Hot Weather.

– Wet BC Coast; Warmer and Drier Interior.

– Newfoundland and Labrador Likely to be Disappointed this Summer Due to Cooler and Wetter Conditions.

– ‘Bone-Dry’ for the Yukon, NWT, and Nunavut.

*Some Potential for Record-Breaking Heat (the Upper 30s) for Parts of ON and Parts of QC for the Last Week of July or 1st Week of August.

Brief Discussion

We at TCW are expecting overall, the country to be slightly above seasonal for the majority of the two months. We expect consistent heat to surge into Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec. While the heat will be slightly less humid as is typical, the heat will be quite consistent for the months of July and August.

It is expected that Manitoba, Ontario and Quebec will be quite dry for these two months, but, become inundated with intermittent days of isolated severe thunderstorms as a result of day-time heating.

The Maritimes are expected to warm-up as the summer progresses, while Newfoundland and Labrador is expected to remain cool and somewhat wet.

Saskatchewan and Alberta will have a few periods of hot weather (especially Saskatchewan), however temperatures will overall, be more warm to very-warm than hot.

British Columbia will remain seasonal and wet near the immediate coast, with the interior being drier and a few degrees above seasonal.

The Yukon, NWT and Nunavut will be slightly above seasonal and very dry.

– TCW

Newfoundland and Labrador

Sorry Newfoundland – Some Regions to Receive Substantial Snow!


A strengthening low-pressure system will lead to a substantial – and unseemly – amounts of snow for parts of Newfoundland this week. Heavy snow, isolated freezing rain and heavy rain are probable.

Timing
Late Wednesday through Thursday.

Snow
The heaviest snow will reside around NE regions of Newfoundland where around, or slightly above 30cm, is possible. Undulating drier air and waves of moist air for N and NE regions of Newfoundland will allow for appreciable snowfall amounts, although somewhat localized on the upper-end of the aforementioned range due to the drier air. Elsewhere, 10-20cm is possible with slightly lesser amounts for Eastern regions of the province.

Freezing Rain
Localized freezing rain is possible south of Glovertown and SW of Eastport. Up to 7-8mm of accretion is not out-of-the-question, however, impact will be extremely localized; a mixed bag of precipitation – including rain showers – will melt much of the ice, nonetheless.

Rain
Heavy rain will inundate much of the Avalon Peninsula and the Southern Newfoundland shoreline and somewhat lesser, although still prevalent, near regions such as: Carbonear, Clarenville and Bonavista.

Wet snow for this entire region cannot be ruled out.

This is expected to be a reasonably significant system given the time of year – we know this it not the news Newfoundlanders want to hear!

Please adjust your driving habits accordingly.

Please stay tuned, as we at TCW are monitoring this situation attentively.

Drive safe and always be alert during hazardous conditions.

For hourly and live storm updates around the clock, follow us on Twitter.
https://twitter.com/TransCANWeather

New Brunswick

[FINAL UPDATE – 04/07 @ 6:15PM] Snowstorm Looms for…


Here we go again – a significant snowstorm for Nova Scotia, Cape Breton and Western Newfoundland. As much as 35cm or locally more in the most impacted regions.

Energy off the East Coast of the USA will be set to sweep off-shore and close to Nova Scotia and Western Newfoundland.

Key Updates as of 04/07 @ 6:15PM

Confidence is quite high that a significant snowstorm will move into the region of Atlantic Canada, and target most of Nova Scotia (including Cape Breton), eastern PEI, and Newfoundland (mainly Western Newfoundland).

Overall snowfall totals for impacted regions (as per our map above) can be expected in a range of 15-25cm. We at TCW expect regions 10-20km inland from the Western Newfoundland shoreline as well as 5-10km inland from the NW Cape Breton shoreline to reach 25-40cm of snow.

New Brunswick will be largely non-impacted from this system.

SW Nova Scotia will experience a snow/rain mix.

Central Newfoundland will experience a mix of snow and prolonged light freezing rain, while eastern Newfoundland will experience a wet snow/rain/light freezing rain mix.

**Note: There is some potential some localized regions in south-central and central Newfoundland (roughly 20km N/NW of Burgeo and extending to Grand-Falls-Windsor, to receive around 10-15cm of snow as well as 8-15mm of freezing rain). Elsewhere, light freezing rain risks exists, but the accretion will be half or less than the aforementioned accretion.

Saturday
Conditions can colloquially be phrased as “calm before the storm”, with relatively calm conditions.
Conditions will begin to slowly deteriorate for SW Nova Scotia very late Saturday Night.

Sunday
Conditions will deteriorate through much of Nova Scotia by the pre-dawn.
Conditions will deteriorate through much of PEI and Cape Breton by the afternoon.

Sunday Evening (6pm MST)
Conditions should improve (progressively) for most of the Maritimes and conditions will deteriorate across Newfoundland.

Monday
Conditions will slowly improve all-together for the Maritimes.

Tuesday
Conditions will slowly improve all-together for Newfoundland.

Watch for gusty winds and local blowing snow.

Please stay tuned, as we at TCW are monitoring this situation attentively.

Drive safe and always be alert during hazardous conditions.

For hourly and live storm updates around the clock, follow us on Twitter.
https://twitter.com/TransCANWeather

New Brunswick

April Snow Brings May Flowers? Hmm…


The feisty Colorado Low inevitably set to move into Ontario will impact Quebec, the Maritimes and Newfoundland with mostly snow [of varying intensities], Wednesday PM into Thursday PM – lingering until Friday AM.

Snow and Ice

Beginning late Wednesday, snow will quickly spread across Quebec and bring alongside, heavy accumulating snow, particularly for the Northeastern Quebec Suburbs where 30cm or more could potentially fall. For Quebec City, 20-30cm is probable.

For New Brunswick, there will be a drastic and sharp transition line between heavy snow, freezing rain and rain. Currently, regions around the Bathurst region SW of a line to just south of Edmundston could receive significant freezing rain (10-15mm), thereby an inverse relationship will form: higher ice accretion, and lower snow accumulations. Elsewhere across New Brunswick, snowfall amounts will become significantly reduced the further south one travels (and higher probability of rain).

Across Newfoundland, light snow will encompass much of the province, however, there is reasonable certainty sea-effect enhancement will provide further snowfall for regions such as Corner Brook and Stephenville.

Rain

Nova Scotia, most of PEI, Cape Breton and parts of New Brunswick will experience rain. For most regions, the rain will be a non-factor, however, Southern and South-Central regions of New Brunswick, could receive 30-45mm of Rain, locally near 50mm.

Widespread gusty winds will be a noteworthy concern.

When will the cold relinquish?
As recently predicted and outlined in our Spring/Summer forecast, it is [and we expect] Spring to be relatively cool across much of Eastern Canada with above normal precipitation. However, we do believe more moderating temperatures will begin to enter the Eastern half of the country beginning very late April, and more prominently into early May.

Please stay tuned, as we at TCW are monitoring this situation attentively.

Drive safe and always be alert during winter conditions.

For hourly and live storm updates around the clock, follow us on Twitter.
https://twitter.com/TransCANWeather

Alberta

Canada Spring and Summer Highlights: Summer to Arrive; Will…



Canada’s Summer Highlights; Spring Temperatures and Spring Precipitation Forecast: From TransCanada Weather

Through careful analysis of ocean temperatures, atmospheric patterns and continental, national and global temperatures, we have formulated and depicted our predictions across the country for Spring and Summer 2018.

Spring

Atlantic Canada
A relatively active storm track across the entire region as listed, will provide ample opportunities for a mixed bag of precipitation for eastern sections, with snow for western sections through late March into early April.

Parts of New Brunswick, PEI, Western Nova Scotia, Western Newfoundland and most of Labrador can expect opportunities for snow.

Temperatures will be below seasonal, particularly through early April and slowly begin to moderate from late April into May for all of Atlantic Canada.

Ontario and Quebec
A relatively active storm track will also be present particularly from late March into early April. Opportunities for snow exist, however, temperatures will likely be slightly too mild for significant snow accumulations. However, below seasonal temperatures and slightly above precipitation are expected until mid April.

Temperatures will begin to moderate particularly later in April and seasonal weather will become more prevalent and consistent in May.

Prairies
The Prairies will continue to remain fairly seasonal this spring with dry conditions at times, particularly later in spring; average precipitation early in the spring.

British Columbia
Much of British Columbia will experience warm surges of Pacific air with an inundation at times, of moisture from Pacific low pressure systems.

Northern Territories
The NWT are expected to be seasonal and dry for much of April and May.

Summer

Atlantic Canada
An active storm track at times will provide for soaking rains and isolated severe thunderstorms at times, throughout the summer. This summer will be fairly consistently warm across the entire region with periods of hot and humid weather.

Summer will arrive, but some time will be required.

It is expected that warmth will begin to build into late June through July and August.

Ontario and Quebec
An active storm track will provide surges of heat across the region, particularly in late June through August. Severe weather will make visits at times this summer, however, it is expected the early portion of summer will remain somewhat dry, and slightly cool, with active and a widespread severe risk building from late July into August.

There is reasonable certainty that June will provide some bouts of cooler and drier weather relative to the norm.

Prairies
The Prairies will receive a typical summer; warm with periods of stiffing temperatures, severe thunderstorms and large hail and isolated tornadic risks, particularly across Alberta and Saskatchewan.

British Columbia
British Columbia is expected to be slightly cooler this summer, although not exceptionally cool. Surges of hot and dry weather that typically show through July-September may be somewhat limited this summer, although not non-existent.

Its not all bad news for the BC coast as moisture is expected to be to the north and south.

Northern Territories
The NWT are expected to be seasonal and dry for much of June, July and August.

https://twitter.com/TransCANWeather

– TCW

New Brunswick

Here We Go Again: Another Nor’easter

Another Nor’easter Targets the Maritimes Thursday; Late Thursday through Friday for Newfoundland.

A relentless parade of Nor’easters continue to track into the aforementioned regions. While amounts will not be entirely substantial due to slightly warmer surface and upper atmospheric temperatures, amounts will still threaten commute and travel times.

The low pressure system will approach from the southwest bringing alongside a widespread swath of snow, however, transitions to rain/wet snow and/or ice pellets will encompass much of the shoreline of Nova Scotia, thereby likely limiting snow.

The heaviest snowfall accumulations will reside in SE New Brunswick and NW Nova Scotia, and PEI, through Thursday; for Newfoundland, the heaviest snow will reside in western sections.

Depending on the exact [and final] track of the Nor’easter, amounts may vary from the listed depictions +/- 5cm.

Please stay tuned, as we at TCW are monitoring this situation attentively.

Drive safe and always be alert during winter conditions.

For hourly and live storm updates around the clock, follow us on Twitter.
https://twitter.com/TransCANWeather